Author(s): Grace Kurian, Theresa Leonilda Mendonca

Email(s): gracelijo2010@gmail.com

DOI: 10.52711/2454-2652.2021.00081   

Address: Grace Kurian1, Theresa Leonilda Mendonca2
1Associate Professor, Department of Child Health Nursing, MOSC College of Nursing, Kolenchery.
2Prof. Head of the Department Paediatric Nursing Laxmi Memorial College of Nursing, Mangalore. Karnataka.
*Corresponding Author

Published In:   Volume - 9,      Issue - 4,     Year - 2021


ABSTRACT:
Background of the study: Immunizations cause distress in children due to its acute pain. Younger children are particularly in need of intervention because they report more pain and display more behavioral distress during painful procedures. One of the effective non-pharmacological interventions of acute management is comfort position given by the parent. Comfort position provided by the parent during immunizations has been demonstrated to be useful in infants, toddlers and pre-school children. Yet, this simple intervention is not used on a routine basis. Aim: The aim of the study was to compare the impact of sitting and supine position on behavioral distress during immunization among children (1-3 years) in selected immunization clinics. Objectives of the study: To determine the impact of sitting position on behavioral distress of children receiving immunization (Group I - experimental group). 1. To determine the impact of supine position on behavioral distress of children receiving immunization (Group II - control group). 2. To compare the impact of sitting and supine position on behavioral distress of children during immunization. Methods: The research design adopted for the study was post test only control group design. Immunization clinic selected based on the convenience of the investigator. Purposive sampling technique used to select the sample and the sample were assigned randomly in to Group I(experimental group) and Group II(control group).To assess the impact of position: PBRS-R was used to assess the behavioral distress of children during immunization injection. Results: The collected data was analyzed by descriptive and inferential statistics. 1. Assessment of behavioral distress scores during immunization injection showed significant difference in mean scores in Group I (16.4±2.30) and in Group II (28.45±2.59). 2. Comparison of behavioral distress scores in Group I and Group II showed that there is a significant difference (p<0.05) in behavioral distress between experimental (Group I) and control (Group II) group. 3. Item wise comparison of behavioral distress scores in Group I and Group II showed that there is no significant difference(p<0.05) in behavioral distress between experimental (Group I) and control (Group II) group. Interpretation and conclusion: Findings of the study revealed that the comfort position, i.e., sitting position was effective in reducing behavioral distress during immunisation. Hence, paediatric nurses ought to promote the use of comfort position to reduce behavioral distress associated with painful procedure.


Cite this article:
Grace Kurian, Theresa Leonilda Mendonca. To compare the impact of sitting and supine position on behavioral distress during immunization among children (1-3 years) in selected immunization clinics. International Journal of Advances in Nursing Management. 2021; 9(4):351-8. doi: 10.52711/2454-2652.2021.00081

Cite(Electronic):
Grace Kurian, Theresa Leonilda Mendonca. To compare the impact of sitting and supine position on behavioral distress during immunization among children (1-3 years) in selected immunization clinics. International Journal of Advances in Nursing Management. 2021; 9(4):351-8. doi: 10.52711/2454-2652.2021.00081   Available on: https://ijanm.com/AbstractView.aspx?PID=2021-9-4-4


REFERENCES:
1.    Marlow DR, Redding BA. Paediatric Nursing. Philadelphia: Elsevier; 2007.
2.    Emine E, Zeynep EC. The use of breastfeeding for pain relief during neonatal immunization injection. Applied Nursing Research 2007;20:10.
3.    Wong DL. Nursing care of infants and children. New York:  Mosby Publications; 1995.
4.    Nath B, Singh JV, Awasthi S. Client satisfaction with immunization services in urban slums of Lucknow district. Indian Journal of Paediatrics 2009;76.
5.    http://www.indianpaediatrics.net/Nov 2000.
6.    Child Development Project Office Survey Report, November 2009.
7.    Agras S, Sylvester D, Oliveau D. The epidemiology of common fears and phobias. Comprehensive Psychiatry 1996; 10:1151-6.
8.    http://www.pub.com/journal.
9.    Stevens B, Johnson C. Premature infant pain profile: development and initial validation. 1996; 12:13-22.
10.    McCarthy AM, Kleiber C. A conceptual model of factors influencing children’s responses to a painful procedure when parents are distraction coaches. Journal of Paediatric Nursing 2006;21(2):88-96.
11.    Bowen AM, Dammeyer MM. Reducing children’s immunization distress in a primary care setting. Journal of Paediatric Nursing 1999;14(5):296.
12.    Simons J, Frank L, Roberson E. Parent involvement in children’s pain care: views of parents and nurses. Journal of Advanced Nursing 2001;36(4):591-9.
13.    Breau ML, McGrath JP, Craig KD.. Facial expression of children receiving immunizations: A principal components analysis of the child facial coding system. The Clinical Journal of Pain 2001; 17:178-86.
14.    McGrath PJ, Unruts AM. Pain in children and adolescents. Amsterdam: Elsevier; 1997.
15.    Johnston CC. Development of psychological responses to pain in infants and toddlers. Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins; 1998.
16.    Fanurik D, Koh JL, Harrison RD. Pain assessment in children with cognitive impairment; an exploration of self-report skills. Clinical Nursing Research 1998; 7:103-24.
17.    McGrath PJ, Rosmus C, Camfield C. Behaviors caregivers use to determine pain in non-verbal, cognitively impaired individuals. Dev Med Child Neuro 1998; 40:340-43.
18.    Beyer JE, McGrath PJ, Berde CB. Discordance between self-report and behavioral pain measures in children aged 3-7 years after surgery. J Pain Symptom Management 1997; 5:350-56.
19.    Stanford EA, Chambers CT, Craig KD. Ow!: spontaneous verbal pain expression among young children during immunization. Clinical Journal of Pain 2005;21(60).
20.    Craig KD. Textbook of pain. 2nd ed. New Delhi: Oxford University of Printing House; 1989.
21.    Ball JW, Bindler RC. Paediatric nursing. 2nd ed. St. Louis: Mosby Publication; 1998.
22.    Hockenberry MJ, Wilson D. Nursing care of infants and children. Missouri: Mosby; 2007.
23.    Ipp M, Taddio A, Sam J. Vaccine related pain: randomized controlled trail of two injection techniques. Archives of Disease in Childhood 2007; 92:1105.
24.    Horn MI, McCarthy AM. Children's responses to sequential versus simultaneous immunization injections. J Paediatr Health Care 1999;13(1):18-23.
25.    Baryza MJ, Sheridan RL, Whitehead-Pleaux AM. Exploring the effects of music therapy on paediatric pain: phase 1. J Music Ther 2007 ;44(3):217-41.
26.    Stanford EA, Chambes CT, Craig KD. Ow! spontaneous verbal pain expression among young children during immunization. Clinical J Pain 2005;21(6):499-502.
27.    Adeqbenro A, Jacobson RM, Swan A. Making vaccines more acceptable-methods to prevent and minimise pain and other common adverse events associated with vaccines. 2001; 21:19 (17- 19):2418-27.
28.    Sparks LA, Setlik J, Luhman J. Parental holding and positioning to decrease IV distress in young children: A randomised controlled trail. Journal of Paediatric Nursing 2007;22(6): 440-7.
29.    Cavender K. Parents positioning and distracting children during venipuncture, effects on children’s pain, fear, and distress. Journal of Holistic Nursing 2004;22(1):32-56.
30.    Sparks L. Taking the “ouch” out of injections for children, Using distraction to decrease pain. American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing 2001;26(2):72-8.
31.    French GM, Painter EC, Coury DL. Blowing away shot pain: a technique for pain management during immunization. Paediatrics 2000;93(3):384-8.
32.    Ali MF, Statinaz R, Motivash S. Effect of local refrigeration prior to venipuncture on pain related responses in school age children. Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing 2006;24(2):51-4.

Recomonded Articles:

Author(s): Girish Degavi, Vasanth Damalli, Prabhu Jevoor

DOI:         Access: Open Access Read More

Author(s): Rinu J George1, Jophin Joseph, Shiny. T. Sam, Jyothy George

DOI: 10.5958/2454-2652.2016.00040.8         Access: Open Access Read More

Author(s): Susheelkumar V. Ronad, Shrinivas K, Meghamala S. Tavaragi, Vijayalxmi Shindhe, Ashok S. Kori, Obanaik P

DOI: 10.5958/2454-2652.2016.00026.3         Access: Closed Access Read More

Author(s): Sheela Victor, Sarah Johnson, Parimala.S., Arpana.Joy.C, P S Sundar Rao

DOI: 10.5958/2454-2652.2017.00017.8         Access: Open Access Read More

Author(s): Ravindra HN, Kevin S. Christian, Pooja. G, Prem. R, Priyal. J, Rajat. A, Riya. R

DOI: 10.5958/2454-2652.2016.00088.3         Access: Open Access Read More

Author(s): Sanjay S. Shinde, Frew. T

DOI: 10.5958/2454-2652.2016.00036.6         Access: Closed Access Read More

International Journal of Advances in Nursing Management (IJANM) is an international, peer-reviewed journal devoted to nursing sciences. IJANM's aim is to promote..... Read more >>>

RNI: Not Available                     
DOI: 10.5958/2454-2652 

Popular Articles


Recent Articles




Tags