Author(s): Lavanya Suku, Santhi Appavu

Email(s): lavjacob88@gmail.com

DOI: 10.5958/2454-2652.2021.00028.7   

Address: Mrs. Lavanya Suku1, Dr. Santhi Appavu2
1Assistant Professor, Christian College of Nursing, Neyyoor.
2Principal, Christian College of Nursing, Neyyoor.
The Tamilnadu Dr. M.G.R. Medical University, Chennai.
*Corresponding Author

Published In:   Volume - 9,      Issue - 1,     Year - 2021


ABSTRACT:
The premature birth of an infant and the following neonatal intensive care cause psychological distress and can have a traumatizing effect on parents. The neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) environment has the potential to exacerbate stress for parents of infants admitted to the NICU. Mothers have typically been found to have higher levels of distress than fathers and they experience significant levels of stress and depression in the early postpartum period. Maternal stress can have deleterious effects on mother-infant interaction, particularly on mothers’ abilities to form an attachment to their baby. Participating in infant care influences the maternal feelings in a positive direction. When the mother is nearby, breastfeeds and takes care of her child's daily care she has a feeling of participation. This situation creates a need for practices that support parents during the acute phase of their infant's hospitalization in neonatal intensive care. The facilitation of maternal confidence and positive parenting in the NICU may be a key point in establishing and sustaining long-term healthy mother-infant interactions and positive child outcomes.


Cite this article:
Lavanya Suku, Santhi Appavu. Maternal Empowerment Programme for Mothers of Preterm Infants. Int. J. of Advances in Nur. Management. 2021; 9(1):106-109. doi: 10.5958/2454-2652.2021.00028.7


REFERENCE:
1.    Kabeer N. Reflections on the measurement of women’s empowerment. In: Discussing Women’s Empowerment-Theory and Practice. Stockholm: Novum Grafiska AB; 2001.
2.    Malhotra A, Schuler SR, Boender C. Measuring Women's Empowerment as a Variable in International Development. Washington: World Bank; 2002.
3.    Sen G. Womens empowerment and human rights: the challenge to policy. In: Population -- the complex reality. A Report of the Population Summit of the World's Scientific Academies, edited by Francis Graham-Smith. London: Royal Society; 1994. p. 363–72.
4.    Klugman J, Hanmer L, Twigg S, Hasan T, McCleary-Sills J, Santamaria J. Voice and agency: Empowering women and girls for shared prosperity. Washington: World Bank Publications; 2014.
5.    Pratley P. Associations between quantitative measures of women's empowerment and access to care and health status for mothers and their children: A systematic review of evidence from the developing world. Soc Sci Med. 2016;169: 119–31.
6.    James-Hawkins L, Peters C, VanderEnde K, Bardin L, Yount KM. Women's agency and its relationship to current contraceptive use in lower- and middle-income countries: A systematic review of the literature. Glob Public Health. 2016:1–16. doi:10.1080/ 17441692.2016.1239270. Epub ahead of print.
7.    Ahmed S, Creanga AA, Gillespie DG, Tsui AO. Economic status, education and empowerment: implications for maternal health service utilization in developing countries. PLoS One. 2010;5(6): e11190.
8.    Carlson GJ, Kordas K, Murray-Kolb LE. Associations between women's autonomy and child nutritional status: a review of the literature. Matern Child Nutr. 2015;11(4):452–482. doi: 10.1111/ mcn.12113.
9.    Hou X, Ma N. The effect of women's decision-making power on maternal health services uptake: evidence from Pakistan. Health Policy Plan. 2013;28(2):176–184. doi: 10.1093/heapol/czs042.
10.    Bloom SS, Wypij D, Das Gupta M. Dimensions of women's autonomy and the influence on maternal health care utilization in a north Indian city. Demography. 2001;38(1):67–78. doi: 10.1353/ dem.2001.0001.
11.    Pratley P. Associations between quantitative measures of women's empowerment and access to care and health status for mothers and their children: a systematic review of evidence from the developing world. SocSci Med. 2016;169: 119–131. doi: 10.1016/ j.socscimed.2016.08.001.

Recomonded Articles:

Author(s): Jisha Susan Varghese, Ravichandran, Rebecca Samson, . Sujatha. S

DOI: : 10.5958/2454-2652.2018.00027.6         Access: Open Access Read More

Author(s): Chetan S. Patali, Susheel Kumar V. Ronad, Suvarna S. Pinnapati

DOI: 10.5958/2454-2652.2018.00038.0         Access: Open Access Read More

Author(s): V. Sasi, S. Kamala

DOI:         Access: Open Access Read More

Author(s): J. Kezia Angeline

DOI:         Access: Open Access Read More

Author(s): Kavitha. D

DOI: 10.5958/2454-2652.2020.00024.4         Access: Closed Access Read More

Author(s): Kavitha D.

DOI: 10.5958/2454-2652.2020.00078.5         Access: Closed Access Read More

Author(s): Ripka Gamit, Jomy R., Hansa Rathod, Neethu Abrahams, Binali Patel, Mini Mathew, Bhanumati Poptani, Bincy Mathew, Nimisha Solanki

DOI: 10.5958/2454-2652.2021.00002.0         Access: Closed Access Read More

Author(s): Lavanya Suku, Santhi Appavu

DOI: 10.5958/2454-2652.2021.00028.7         Access: Closed Access Read More

International Journal of Advances in Nursing Management (IJANM) is an international, peer-reviewed journal devoted to nursing sciences. IJANM's aim is to promote..... Read more >>>

RNI: Not Available                     
DOI: 10.5958/2454-2652 

Popular Articles


Recent Articles




Tags