Experience of Divine Garbhasanskar practice expressed by Antenatal Mothers of North West Karnataka after imparting training during First Trimester

 

Vijaylaxmi K. Shindhe1, Dhiraj J. Trivedi2*

1Principal, Bagalkota School of Nursing and Paramedical College, Bagalkota, Karnataka, India.

2*Professor, SDM College of Medical Sciences and Hospital, Dharwad, Karnataka, India.

*Corresponding Author E-mail: dhiraj99trivedi@gmail.com

 

ABSTRACT:

Divine Garbhasanskar (DGS) practices through music, meditation and mantra provides positivity in expected mothers. DGS is an amazing way of education towards creating bonding between mother and unborn child in the womb during pregnancy. In present study, we present a second phase of our study as the experiences of DGS practices by antenatal mother after training. We found more than 58% ANC mothers were aware of DGS but, none were practicing. Only 8% mothers know about positive effect of music and 3% know about communication with unborn child. The experience of ANC mother as response to music by fetus increased gradually from first trimester to 3rd trimester. The response to touch was felt remarkable in 3rd trimester. Touch response was experienced positively with increasing frequency as gestation age advanced. Whereas experienced of communication in 1st trimester was minimum, which gradually increased and reached at its highest in 3rd trimester. Outcome of present study suggest there is behavioural change in the fetus as response to music, touch and verbal communication. This can be better experienced and communicated by ANC mother after DGS training. Thus DGS training creates bonding between mother and fetus and develops positivity and enjoyable pregnancy experience.

 

KEYWORDS: Garbhasanskara, Divine karmas, Antenatal mother, Nursing, Music, Touch, Communication.

 


INTRODUCTION:

In Indian Hindu culture; a female in her phase of pregnancy is considered as Goddess of creator. But, psychologically and medically, it is most difficult phase of her life. This period of her life is of immense importance to herself as well as to her family members.

 

 

 

As for creating unique master piece an artesian puts all his mental and physical concentrated efforts in his creation, similarly positivity in expected mother may prove important in her creativity toward unique creation. Divine Garbhasanskar (DGS) practices through music, meditation and mantra provides positivity in expected mothers. DGS is an amazing way of education towards creating bonding between mother and unborn child in the womb during pregnancy. Ayurveda trusts that thoughts and feelings of mother exercise through DGS practices are sensed, felt, listened and responded by fetus in the womb [1, 2]. Even benefit of DGS practices promotes overall mental and physical wellbeing of expected mother which enhances chances of normal delivery, postnatal good health and enjoyable process of motherhood [3]. DGS and yoga are beneficial to unborn baby [4]. There are many web articles posted by different organizations involved in DGS training stating that fetus in the womb responds to the feeling and touch of mother also the communication occurring between mother and fetus [5]. Still there are lacunas and disbelief existing among the society regarding DGS [6, 7].

Today, many organizations are working towards the goal of molding the future generation through Garbhasanskar [8] There are reports available about practice of Garbhasanskar from Maharashtra, Gujarat and Madhya Pradesh in India, but study in scientific direction is not available. To fill the lacuna of knowledge, we completed and published first phase of our study which confirms the knowledge, attitude and practice among antenatal mothers of North West Karnataka [9]. In continuation to this we have taken up a second phase of our study as the experiences of DGS practices by antenatal mother after training.

 

Objectives of the study:

1.    To assess the experiences of pregnancy among antenatal mothers without having DGS training.

2.    To assess the experiences of pregnancy among antenatal mothers who received DGS training in first trimester.

3.    To correlation the experiences of pregnancy among antenatal mothers of both the groups.

 

HYPOTHESES:

There will be no significant differences and correlation between the experiences of DGS training among antenatal mothers visiting ANC OPD of our Medical College Hospital at North West Karnataka.

 

ASSUMPTIONS

·      The Antenatal mothers may be having some experience about touch, music and communication existing between mother and fetus.

·      The Antenatal mothers may not feel any difference in experience towards touch, music and communication practices performed as part of DGS training.

·       The Antenatal mothers may feel some difference in experience towards touch, music and communication practices performed as part of DGS training.

 

Research Design:

A.     Population, Samples, Sampling technique:

The study population consists of 60 ANC mothers visiting outpatient department of OBG-ANC clinic of our Medical College Hospital at North West Karnataka (India). A nonprobability purposive sampling method was adopted for the present study. Pregnant mothers in their first trimester and belonging to 25 to 35 years age group were included in the study population.

 

Study population was divided in to two groups. Group A – comprised 30 ANC mothers who were given training for DGS in first trimester [10]. Group B – Comprised 30 ANC mothers who were not imparted any DGS training.

 

B.     Institutinal and Ethical permission:

Permission for the present study on ANC mothers visiting OBG-ANC Clinic of our hospital was obtained from the concerned authorities. The researcher has oriented ANC mothers by informing the purpose of the study and after obtaining their consent ANC mothers were included in the study group. Confidentiality and ethics were maintained during data collection.

 

As first part of present study pre-test questionnaire was issued and experience responses were collected from both groups. In second part Group – A, ANC mothers were trained about the practices and responses of DGS through touch, music and communication. Response answer on DGS experiences were collected every month by formulated Questionnaire. Group – B, ANC mothers were asked to give response answer of questionnaire but not given any DGS training. Post-test questionnaire were issued after the delivery and experience responses were collected from each of the participants.

 

C.     DURATION OF STUDY: 12 month

 

Development and description of the questionnaire:

A descriptive survey method was adopted for data collection in the present study. A structured questionnaire was prepared to extract information on experiences of DGS practices using tools like 1.Touch 2.Music and 3.Communication methods before and after training.

 

Analysis of the Data:

Data collected by above method were tabulated and analyzed by using descriptive statistic.

 

RESULT:

Before enrolling the ANC mothers; their alertness and practical knowledge regarding DGS were evaluated by our 1st part questionnaire. We found among 60 ANC mothers included in present study 24% were aware about DGS traditions, 58% mothers had knowledge about DGS which was acquired from different sources but only 06% mothers expressed they were practicing DGS methods as part of routine to obtain desired child. None of them had any proper training about DGS methods in past. [Table 1 and Chart 1]

 

Table 1: Primary knowledge and Practices of DGS among ANC mother

Primary Knowledge and Practices

Yes

No

Music

8%

92%

Touch

65%

35%

Communication

3%

97%

 

 

We could make out from our study questionnaire that, among 60 ANC mothers, primegravida mothers were more attentive and knowledgeable about such practices whereas, multigravida mothers were more in practices of DGS but none of them had understanding about how to perform and experience communication with fetus.

 

Music:

Among 60 ANC mothers, 92% mothers did not know the effect of music on fetus only 8% had information about positive effect of music on fetal growth. Once again more number of primegravida mothers had bookish information and more alert to experience as compared to multigravida mothers.

 

Soft pitch music may bring tranquillity whereas high pitch may cause agitation. To experience the response of music by fetus we trained Group –A ANC mothers to listen music of different kind according to their choice. Expected recognition responses were in the form of rotation or calming down of fetus or bumping to the abdomen by fetus.

 

We observed the experience of response to music by fetus increased from 9.36% in first trimester to 46.22% in second trimester and 63.16% in 3rd trimester. Mothers indicated varied type and level of positive kind experiences. It was also noted that experience to the response gradually increased as growth of fetus advanced. On the other hand Group B ANC mothers reported almost no to very poor type response. May be they could not identify the response given by fetus. [Table 2 and Chart 2]

 

Table 2: % Experience for response to music expressed by ANC mothers

% Experience for response to music

Group A

Group B

First Trimester

9.36

3.13

Second Trimester

46.22

5.46

Third Trimester

63.16

9.4

 

 

 

Touch:

Emotional touch of mother can bring calmness and confidence in child. Among both the groups more than 65% ANC mothers had information that touch can communicate mother’s feeling to fetus. To experience relation and response of touch by fetus we adopted soft touch to gentle rubbing on mother’s abdomen by mother, father or family members for Group A only. Any rotations by fetus or kicking were expected response. Experience of response to touch was of remarkable in 3rd trimester. Touch response was experienced positively with increasing frequency ranging from 12.03% in 1st trimester to 57.52% 2nd trimester and 82.33% in 3rd trimester among group A. Most mother expressed touch was the most effective way of making relation among three practices. In Group B experience was reported as 21% but in third trimester only. [Table 3 and Chart 3]

 

Table 3: % Experience for response to Touch expressed by ANC mothers

% Experience for response to Touch

Group A

Group B

First Trimester

12.03

8.25

Second Trimester

57.52

13.7

Third Trimester

82.33

21.82

 

 

 

 

 

 

Communication:

Making bond with fetus by verbal communication was known by only 3% ANC mothers. As part of verbal communication talking to fetus by mother, father or family members were adopted and fetal movements in womb were expected as recognition response. The minimum response was experienced in 1st trimester [6.43%] which gradually increased in 2nd trimester to 45.03% and reached at its highest 76.61% in 3rd trimester in group A. Group B was totally unaware about such experience.[Table 4 and Chart 4]

 

Table 4: % Experience for response to communication expressed by ANC mothers

% Experience for response to Communication

Group A

Group B

First Trimester

6.43

1.1

Second Trimester

45.03

1.75

Third Trimester

76.61

2.5

 

 

 

Discussion:

Music

Fetus in womb can recognize music played at pleasurable node for its mother [11]. It has been observed that prenatal exposure of such music bring some behavioural changes in fetus [12].The response gradually increases over the gestational age which mother can experience [13] It has been reported that prenatal music exposure not only modifies the fetal behavioural but also continue in new bornphase [14]. Study conducted on animal shows improved learning and memory functions [15].Experienced by ANC mother towards response of music by fetus observed in present study concurs with results from other published papers. Music has positive influence on the neonatal behaviour which was indicated by varied type and level of fetal activities experienced by ANC mothers under study group. Second observation noted in present study that this experience is felt only if mothers are given training to recognize fetal response. A limitation in our study was we allowed individual mothers to decide about the type of music as per their choice hence, the level of response noted by each mother was different.

 

Touch:

Understandings emerged form present study suggests that there is positive behavioural response expressed by fetus towards the touch. Outcome of the study also suggest that fetus can familiarize the touch by early 20-21 week of gestation. It responses positively to known personal touch. Among these maternal touch to abdomen was proved to be strong stimulus producing fetal response and fetal reply to touch increases with the gestational age.

 

Existing literature confirms that fetus develops touch sense recognition in early 9th week of gestation, In initial period fetus tries to move away from the stimulus but with advance gestational age it recognize natural touch by migrating in the direction of stimulus. Response to touch by fetus is exhibited by typical movements which starts at 7th week but, untrained mothers may not recognize at this early. A sharp kick or small rhythmic kicks or rotation from 16 to 21 week onwards become noticeable experience by mother. Unfamiliar, disliking intrauterine movements of fetus are noted during amniocentesis [16] suggests fetus can express pain response too.

 

Our study also reported a motivating behavioural change with maturation from the 2nd to the 3rd trimester. Regardless of the experimental condition, fetus in the 3rd trimester displayed more self-touch (hands touching the body) when compared to fetus in 2nd trimester. Although we used the term ‘touch’, the condition however was not direct skin-to-skin contact but an indirect stimulation of the fetus via stroking the abdomen, applying slight pressure.

 

Communication / Voice:

Until late nineteenth century babies were thought to be born deaf and dumb. Maternal voice can stimulate fetal reaction was unaware. Recent knowledge about prenatal learning is based on observation that fetus seems to recognize voice. Few reports suggest that fetus shows an orienting response to mother’s voice [17-19

 

Mother, father and other family members talk and even sing to the fetus throughout pregnancy with communicative intent. Many reported change in the fetal behaviour as a response to such communication. Similar to talking to the fetus, most mothers and even fathers attempt to communicate with and regulate the behaviour of the fetus via fondling to the mother’s abdomen experienced the kicking or positional movements of the fetus.

 

 

 

 

Conclusion:

Understandings emerged from present study suggests that, there is behavioural change in the fetus in response to music, touch and verbal communication. This can be better experienced and communicated by ANC mother after DGS training. Thus DGS training creates bonding between mother and fetus and develops positivity and enjoyable pregnancy experience.

 

IMPLICATIONS:

Finding of present study have wide-ranging implication of DGS in community health and Nursing training.

 

NURSING PRACTICE:

Present understanding of DGS was more of belief than science. This study provides scientific reason for introducing its practice among ANC mothers to create positivity and enjoyable period of pregnancy which is otherwise painful and depressive phase.

 

Nursing and community Education:

This study stress on reintroduction of forgotten traditional practices followed during pregnancy with the goal to create positivity among expected mothers and obtain physically and mentally healthy child.

 

Nursing Research:

Present research conducted as second part of our three phase study provides support and guide line to take up further study on DGS practices for interested ANC mother who aim to have desired baby.

 

LIMITATION:

We accept our short fall in sample size, freedom of DGS practices and not following single stringent method. Also we trusted the response given by ANC mothers without any alternative method of validation.

 

Acknowledgement:

We thank SDM society’s management for permitting this study and offering all the support required for our study. We are grateful to OBG department for providing all the help needed for present study.

 

References:

1.       Vaidya. Rajshree Kulkarni and Vaidya Abhay Kulkarni; Ayurvedic Garbhasanskar: www.indiamart.com/ayushree-ayurvedic/ayurvedik-garbha-sanskar-book.html

2.       Ayurvedic Garbhasanskar: Dr. Balaji Tambe; Published by Sakal Papers, 3rd edition, 2014

3.       Dr. PC Shastri, Dr. G Prasad Rao, Child mental health movement in India IJPP vol 4(2)Sept 2010 Editorial P5

4.       http://www.getfitforbirth.com/thoughts-and-feelings-affect-your-unborn-baby

5.       Fazeli A. Maternal communication with gametes and embryo: a personal opinion.ReprodDomest Anim. 2011 Sep; 46 Suppl 2:75-8

6.       Garbhasanskar: by Dr GauriBorker; MehtaPublishing House, Pune,ISBN 978-81-7766-898-8

7.       www.garbhasanskarforpregnancy.com

8.       http:[//www.garbhsanskarhome.com

9.       Vijayalaxmi Shinde. Dhiraj J. Trivedi. AshaNiravi. Garbhasanskar: Knowledge, Attitude and Practice among Antenatal Mothers of Dharwad, Karnataka. IJANM; 2015:3(4):319-324

10.     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TVVyqCBSUWs and t=1002s

11.     Gerhardt KJ, Abrams RM. Fetal hearing: characterization of the stimulus and response. SeminPerinatol. 1996; 20(1):11-20

12.     Al-QahtaniNHFoetal response to music and voice. Aust N Z J ObstetGynaecol. 2005 Oct; 45(5):414-7

13.     Kisileysky S, Hains SM, Jacquet AY, GranierDeferre C, Lecanuet JP. Maturation of fetal responses to music. Dev. Sci. 2004; 7(5): 550-559.

14.     James DK, Spencer CJ, Stepsis BW. Fetal learning: a prospective randomized controlledstudy.UltrasoundObstetGynecol, 2002;20(5):431-438

15.     Chikahisa S. Sei H, Morishima M, Sano A, Kitaoka K, Nakaya Y, Morita Y. Eposure to music in the perinatal period enhances learning performance and alters BDNF/TrkB signalling in mice as adults. Behav Brain Res. 2006; 169(2):312-319.

16.     Valman HB, Pearson JF What the fetus feels? British medical journal, 1980, 233-34

17.     Kisilevsky BS, Hains SM, Lee K, Xie X Huang H, Ye HH, Zhang K, Wang Z, Effects of experience on fetal voice recognition. Psychol Sci. 2003; 14(3): 220-224

18.     Voegtline KM, Costigan KA, Pater HA, DiPietro JA, Near term fetal response to maternal spoken voice. Infant Behav Dev. 2013; 36(4): 526-533

19.     DeCasper AJ, Spence MJ. Prenatal maternal speech influences newborns’ perception of speech sounds. Infant Behaviour and Development 1986; 9: 133–150

 

 

 

 

 

 

Received on 10.03.2018       Modified on  08.04.2018

Accepted on 28.04.2018       ©A&V Publications All right reserved

Int.  J. of Advances in Nur. Management. 2018; 6(2): 130-134.

DOI: 10.5958/2454-2652.2018.00030.6